HIGH RISE OFFICE BUILDING – MEP DESIGN

Kansas City, Missouri

The Plaza Colonnade is a 340,000 square foot, eleven-story high rise office building. The Kansas City Public Library occupies the first two floors (49,000 square foot of area) while the remaining nine floors (291,000 square foot) are leased office space. A seven story parking garage was constructed on-site to provide parking for 1,290 cars. The total construction cost for the project was $35 million.

We provided the mechanical, electrical, and plumbing design for the core & shell construction of the office, library, and parking garage areas.
DESIGN WITH USE OF SPACE IN MIND

Energy Efficiency Translated to Cost Savings

The schematic design included an energy usage simulation of the building and building systems using the Trane Trace(R) program. The simulation was used to aid the architect in evaluating & selecting the most cost effective, energy efficient building material for construction. For example, the simulations led to the selection of a Low-E glass with a 0.31 U-Value and 0.31 Shading Coefficient, a very efficient glass.

Innovative Solutions

The mechanical system selected consisted of a self-contained air handling unit on each floor with water-cooled compressors. The air-handling systems are fan powered variable air volume (FPVAV). An energy recovery unit preconditions the outside air by recovering the thermal & latent (humidity) energy from the building general exhaust air and transferring that energy minus the contaminants of the exhaust air to the outside air stream by heating or cooling, humidifying or dehumidifying the air depending on the season.

Reliability of Mission-Critical Systems

Power to operate the life safety system as well as critical building functions during a power outage is provided by a 750 kW engine generator. The system is designed & tested to automatically start and transfer the emergency building load to the generator through automatic transfer switches.

Exceeding Standards

The MEP systems were designed to exceed minimum requirements of the 2000 International Building Code (IBC) for high-rise buildings.